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If classical music has a capital, it is Vienna, home to Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Brahms, Mahler, Johann Strauss, Schoenberg and many others. Incredibly, the works on this program were all written in Vienna in the space of just 40 years.
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Piano music from Russia prior to the Revolution
Music-lovers would be surprised to see an all-American concert including works by Schoenberg, Bartok, Hindemith and Rachmaninoff. But these and many other composers, normally associated with Europe and Russia, became American citizens. They emigrated here for freedom, opportunities, and for America's rich and vital cultural life.
    The second half of the recital begins with innovative etudes by Donal Fox, one of America's most brilliant composers. Written for Frederick Moyer as the result of a Guggenheim Foundation grant, these works mix the traditions of jazz and classical music. And a fitting finale: Rhapsody in Blue, written in 1924 by the son of poor Russian Jewish immigrants, embodies America's "melting pot" as various musical styles (jazz, popular, classical and Jewish music) blend together to create something completely fresh and new.
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This title will turn the heads of music aficionados for two reasons. First, how can a piano concerto be presented in a piano recital? Schumann's Piano Concerto in A Minor, Op. 54 is presented here with a recorded orchestral accompaniment using software that Fred wrote, which helps him stay perfectly synchronized with the recording. Fred has consulted with eminent acoustician Steve Colby who supervises sound for live classical concerts at Tanglewood and other venues, to develop a sound system that can match the richness of a full symphony orchestra. Secondly, while Schumann's A Minor Piano Concerto is well-known, what few know is that his Piano Sonata No. 3 in F Minor, Op. 14, was first published as "Concerto Without Orchestra" because of the grandeur of the music and its rich, complex textures.
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Frederick Moyer, known for capturing the styles and spirits of the great jazz pianists, joins friends Billy Novick, Peter Tillotson and Peter Fraenkel to pay tribute to pianist Dave Brubeck, who died on December 5, 2012, one day before his 92nd birthday. A student of Darius Milhaud, he brought a classical music sensibility to jazz. Many of his compositions have become jazz standards, his most famous quartet included the lyrical saxophonist Paul Desmond. Their experiments in unusual meters ("Take Five," "Blue Rondo a la Turk," etc.) became hits and made Dave Brubeck a household name. The Dave Brubeck Quartet broke down racial barriers, often playing in venues that had never before presented a racially mixed group. Many of their performances were in colleges and universities, and they are credited with exposing a young generation to jazz.